UL, a global independent safety science company, recently announced it will evaluate, test and certify hoverboards. These battery-powered hands-free scooters have made headlines for catching fire while people are riding them and while the battery is charging.

UL recognizes there is a strong need for hoverboard certification and will start offering these certification services to manufactures and distributors. UL already evaluates, tests, and certifies battery cells, modules, packs, and related battery chargers and power supplies. UL expert scientists, researchers and engineers have developed requirements and a specific methodology to confidently evaluate and test hoverboards for electrical and fire-hazard safety.

Previously, UL certified batteries and chargers used in some hoverboards, but not the hoverboards themselves. Even when both the battery and charger are separately certified, that doesn’t necessarily mean they will be compatible and the results could be a fire because the battery might not be able to handle the output of the charger.

The Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) is investigating hoverboard-related fires and looking for a cause. To reduce the fire risk if you or your child has a hoverboard, keep it away from combustibles when charging, don’t put it under your bed or near wrapping paper.

Related: Don’t Let Your Child Scoot His Way into the Emergency Room

The Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) is investigating hoverboard-related fires and looking for a cause. To reduce the fire risk if you or your child has a hoverboard, keep it “away from combustibles when charging — that means not putting it under your bed or near wrapping paper,” Drengenberg says.

UL and the National Association of State Fire Marshals (NAFSM) advise following these additional precautions when charging or using a hoverboard:

  • After you use it, let it cool off before you charge it.
  • Don’t leave the hoverboard to charge overnight, and follow the manufacturer’s recommendations for charging times.
  • Avoid knock-off chargers. Use only the one that came with your hoverboard.

If you’re thinking about buying a hoverboard, the NAFSM suggests buying only from reputable online or local stores that offer warranties. “Avoid buying the product at a location (like a mall kiosk) or on a website that does not have information about who is selling the product and how they can be contacted if there is a problem,” the CPSC advises.

Related: What does “GREENGUARD Certified” Mean?


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Angela is a Pulitzer Prize-winning digital editor with more than 15 years of experience delivering news and information to audiences worldwide. Prior to joining SafeBee, she was the features editor for Boston.com at The Boston Globe, overseeing health, travel, entertainment, business and lifestyle coverage. Before moving to features, she was the news and homepage editor, covering stories such as the Boston Marathon bombing, Red Sox World Series victories, presidential elections, a papal inauguration, and more. Her favorite safety tip: Clean your phone! The average cell phone has 18 times more germs than the toilet handle in a men’s restroom.